Wil van der Aalst talking about “How to Mine Your Processes While Exploiting Locality and Structure?”

It is a particular pleasure for us to welcome Wil van der Aalst on the September 10th at the University of Innsbruck, talking about “How to Mine Your Processes While Exploiting Locality and Structure?”.

Abstract. The practical relevance of process mining is increasing as more and more event data become available. Process mining techniques aim to discover, monitor and improve real processes by extracting knowledge from event logs. The two most prominent process mining tasks are: (i) process discovery: learning a process model from example behavior recorded in an event log, and (ii) conformance checking: diagnosing and quantifying discrepancies between observed behavior and modeled behavior. Existing process mining techniques assume “flat event logs” without making assumptions on the underlying event data. This talk focuses on exploiting locality and structure in process mining. Locality in process mining is comparable to the independence assumption in statistical inference. It also helps to speed up analysis. The structure of the underlying data (e.g., cardinality constraints in a relational database) can also be exploited. We do not need to guess how objects are related and should use this knowledge when analyzing behavior. The talk discusses the advantages of process mining techniques guided by locality and structure.

Biography. Prof.dr.ir. Wil van der Aalst is a full professor of Information Systems at the Technische Universiteit Eindhoven (TU/e). At TU/e he is the scientific director of the Data Science Center Eindhoven (DSC/e). Since 2003 he holds a part-time position at Queensland University of Technology (QUT). His personal research interests include workflow management, process mining, Petri nets, business process management, process modeling, and process analysis. Wil van der Aalst has published more than 180 journal papers, 18 books (as author or editor), 400 refereed conference/workshop publications, and 60 book chapters. Many of his papers are highly cited (he one of the most cited computer scientists in the world and has an H-index of 118 according to Google Scholar) and his ideas have influenced researchers, software developers, and standardization committees working on process support. He has been a co-chair of many conferences including the Business Process Management conference, the International Conference on Cooperative Information Systems, the International conference on the Application and Theory of Petri Nets, and the IEEE International Conference on Services Computing. He is also editor/member of the editorial board of several journals, including Computing, Distributed and Parallel Databases, Software and Systems Modeling, the International Journal of Business Process Integration and Management, the International Journal on Enterprise Modelling and Information Systems Architectures, Computers in Industry, Business & Information Systems Engineering, IEEE Transactions on Services Computing, Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, and Transactions on Petri Nets and Other Models of Concurrency. In 2012, he received the degree of doctor honoris causa from Hasselt University in Belgium. He served as scientific director of the International Laboratory of Process-Aware Information Systems of the National Research University, Higher School of Economics in Moscow. In 2013, he was appointed as Distinguished University Professor of TU/e and was awarded an honorary guest professorship at Tsinghua University. In 2015, he was appointed as honorary professor at the National Research University, Higher School of Economics in Moscow. He is also a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen), Royal Holland Society of Sciences and Humanities (Koninklijke Hollandsche Maatschappij der Wetenschappen) and the Academy of Europe (Academia Europaea).

Location: ICT Building, Technikerstraße 21a, 6020 Innsbruck, September 7th, 10:00 (room to be announced).